More on grad school discussion

February 28, 2010

Hi everyone,

I and a few others in our class attended the FASA event at Caprice’s house last night, where a guest artist Shawn Camp gave a small talk about his work.  I found it interesting that like Daniel Dove, he really hammered on the importance of grad school to his development as an artist, calling it the second best decision of his life next to marrying his wife.  If I understood him correctly, he feels that grad school provides something of a buffer between the artist and the real world, allowing the artist to push his or her artistic exploration in a way that more practical real world concerns would render much more difficult if not nearly impossible.  Anyways, just thought I’d give a shot at reinvigorating this discussion.  Hope to hear your thoughts.

-Anthony


The Homeless Tramp of Bucharest

February 26, 2010

Post by Rocky
Ion Barladeanu was old, a nobody, a street urchin. Now he’s a successful artist.

“Now I feel like a prince,” says Barladeanu. “A pauper can become a prince. But he can go back to being a pauper too.”

The guests were chic, the bordeaux was sipped with elegant restraint and the hostess was suitably glamorous in a canary yellow cocktail dress. To an outside observer who made it past the soirée privée sign on the door of the Anne de Villepoix gallery on Thursday night, it would have seemed the quintessential Parisian art viewing.

Yet that would been leaving one crucial factor out of the equation: the man whose creations the crowd had come to see. In his black cowboy hat and pressed white collar, Ion Barladeanu looked every inch the established artist as he showed guests around the exhibition. But until 2007 no one had ever seen his work, and until mid-2008 he was living in the rubbish tip of a Bucharest tower block.

Rags to Riches – Read the rest of the article here.


Pencil Attachment Turns Your Drawings Into Sounds

February 22, 2010
 


Pink is for Battleships

February 21, 2010

Good article on colors and how their meanings can vary from time to time and region to region:

What’s the most politicized color of our age? Pink, we’d have to say, takes the cake. When we think pink, we think Disney princess, Barbie, and Fifi the poodle, and then we think feminists slashing Barbie and Fifi. The ubiquitous pink ribbon has now become the universal symbol of girl power.

But pink hasn’t always been this way. In fact, pink has a decidedly masculine, even butch side: At different points in history, for different countries, it has served as the color of imperialism, speed, and strength in many forms. This slide show reveals a history of this often unladylike color.

Read the rest of the article at Slate.com


February 20, 2010
 

 

Maybe?

An article in the journal Empirical Studies of the Arts suggests that people like art they can relate to. If your statement doesn’t match what the viewer wants to believe, they may be less likely to love the piece.

Read the full article here:
Context May Diminish Art Appreciation


DICKCHICKEN.

February 20, 2010

We talked in class a bit about artist fame, and how they become as big as they are. Doug brought up the idea of artists making a name for themselves without putting the work it takes to develop, as did the band WAVVES. The class also discussed the fact thats Jasper Johns burned all of his previous work to erase the fact that he spent years to get where he was. Recently, with the popularity of street art growing (such as Shepard Fairy and Banksy), I often wonder if some artists use this outlet to get quick fame. The most recent case of this would be DICKCHICKEN, an artist based in Brooklyn. He has recently started the transition from street to gallery, a move that often makes or brakes artists. The part that I find interesting about this artist is that he is getting criticized from the both art and graffiti/street art communities. DICKCHICKEN is often labeled and blown of as “hipster graffiti”. Similar to a lot of street artists, his real name is kept a secret. The secrecy behind the name, in my opinion, only adds to the  mystique of the “artist”. I have not completely made up my mind on what I think he is worth as an artist, but I do enjoy the humor in his work. Below is a short video Playboy made about the artist.

Feel free to comment.

-Evan Hublein – Getloose.wordpress.com


Daniel Dove

February 17, 2010

www.danieldove.com

Visit Texas State in February 2010. Loved it.